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A Better Understanding of Diamond Cut

Along with colour, carats, and clarity, there is a fourth C that greatly impacts the value placed on a diamond. That is the cut. This is such an important part of the manufacturing of diamonds, that the cutters are trained for years upon years before being allowed to craft something of valuable stone.

Becoming a Diamond Cutter

Due to the precise nature of this trade, the training facilities are few and far between. The artists that have cut the most beautiful diamonds in the world won their great honour after displaying great skill and an eye for finding the best facets in a raw stone. That is not to say that a person passionate about diamonds shouldn’t look into this career line. It can be a very rewarding one, but should not be entered into without an extreme dedication to the craft.

Not all diamonds are cut equally, hence the reason that this has become a part of the four classifications of diamonds. Why would a diamond cutter waste time in cutting a subpar diamond?  In many cases, the best cuts cannot be achieved due to the quality of the raw stone, but a final diamond of moderate cut and quality can be achieved, thus serving a market that is shopping within a different budget range. 

Cutters must consider many things when cutting into a raw stone. While one does not want to waste precious material, he also doesn’t want there to be more inclusions (aka. imperfections) in the finished product than absolutely necessary. Thus, he must weigh his options carefully when approaching a new raw stone.

There are five grades that can be bestowed on a newly cut diamond – Poor, Fair, Good, Very Good, and Excellent. Believe it or not, the vast majority of diamonds sold throughout the world will be ‘Good’ at best. Only a small percentage will win the top two grades.

Find some of the best cuts at Diamond Rocks and when you see your diamond in person, you will understand just how beautiful the right cut can be.

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